Was life in the north and south more similar or different before the civil war

Former Confederate states created their own pension systems, but without the financial resources of the federal government, they often faced financial hardship in financing them.

economic differences between north and south that led to civil war

The South grew more cotton than food and was importing its food from the North. Southerners complained of the advantage that the North had in attracting immigrants — although the North with its different kind of economy could absorb the increase of free people better than could the South.

North and south differences civil war

When recession hit in the s Congress hiked the import tax from 15 to 37 per cent. In the North was a general dislike of slavery but little favor in coercing the South into freeing the slaves. What Southern planters wanted was more slaves. The opportunities of industrialization attracted European immigrants led to building major cities in the North. A major factor which further advantaged the Northern states was the importance placed on education in comparison with Southern states. Also, in , the South's agricultural economy was beginning to stall while the Northern manufacturers were experiencing a boom. In the states of the Confederacy, by contrast, few blacks were free. Women of the landed gentry in the South were put on pedestals, and they had slaves to do their work. They wanted no irreparable split from their source of cotton. In the early s, many Northerners belonged to the Whig Party, while Southerners tended towards the Democrats. Gradually, throughout the beginning of the nineteenth century, the North and South followed different paths, developing into two distinct and very different regions.

Gradually, throughout the beginning of the nineteenth century, the North and South followed different paths, developing into two distinct and very different regions.

But slavery was rarely the issue at hand.

What divided the north and south before the civil war

Reconstruction and Its Impact The end of the Civil War brought an official end to slavery, but it did not immediately affect economic, political or social differences. In the South and the West, where income-potential there were fewer opportunities for advancement, evangelical sects were more popular. Our coastwise trade would pass into other hands. The North was manufacturing power looms and exporting them to Europe. Slavery occurred in the North, as well, but was outlawed in the non-border Union states, while slavery continued in Union states bordering Southern slave states. They believed more in leisure than did the Puritans, and they were aided in this by milder winters. According to the census, the US population was 31,, — an increase of 39 percent in one decade. As adults, Southern men tended to belong to the Democratic political party and gravitated toward military careers as well as agriculture. The population of the Northern states was more than twice that of the Southern states.

Railroads were influencing a rise in real estate values, increasing regional concentrations of industry, the size of business units and stimulating growth in investment banking and agriculture.

Illiteracy was more common in the South.

Southern economy after the civil war

Planters were interested in the size of their holdings rather than in cash to invest elsewhere in the economy, and those with a good spread of land were more happy to break even than were the capitalists of New England. Abolitionists were a minority — and more in New England than elsewhere in the North. The North was broadly opposed to slavery and this cultural difference shaped the rhetoric of war. There were boot makers and shoemaking — a winter occupation for New England farmers and fishermen. The South threatened secession and the North was outraged. Gradually, throughout the beginning of the nineteenth century, the North and South followed different paths, developing into two distinct and very different regions. The North, especially New England, had a greater percentage of middle-class people. In the North was still plenty of misery. In the South and the West, where income-potential there were fewer opportunities for advancement, evangelical sects were more popular. Northern states felt slavery should be outlawed, though, many did not wish to compete with former slaves for job opportunities and this sentiment was used politically in anti-Black campaigns in the region. There were not yet many city parks, pleasure resorts, or much game playing. Some Reconstruction era policies even exaggerated them. Industrialization and Immigration The South's slave economy supported agriculture, while the North's free society enabled industrialization. Professionals in the South were little interested in becoming investors in the economy in general. Health care was still largely in a realm of ignorance, with no one knowing how to cure tuberculosis, cholera, diphtheria, yellow fever, typhus and other diseases.

The Puritan work ethic prevailed, people working long hours and six days per week. The North was broadly opposed to slavery and this cultural difference shaped the rhetoric of war.

Economic differences between north and south

Instead of becoming Yankee-like, they dreamed of buying land and a few slaves and retiring as a Southern gentleman on their small plantation. The Northern economy was still largely farming — small farms — with adolescents having time for fishing and hunting. The South grew more cotton than food and was importing its food from the North. According to the census it was 3,,, almost all in the South. Southerners complained of the advantage that the North had in attracting immigrants — although the North with its different kind of economy could absorb the increase of free people better than could the South. By the beginning of the Civil War, only one-ninth of the United States' industrial capacity was situated in the South. In the s a boom in railroad development across the North was changing business organization and management and reducing freight costs. Slavery occurred in the North, as well, but was outlawed in the non-border Union states, while slavery continued in Union states bordering Southern slave states.

In fact, there were almost as many blacks - but slaves and free - in the South as there were whites 4 million blacks and 5.

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Cultural differences before the U.S. Civil War